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23rd February 2016

Maps Maps Maps! Part Two- All About Detail

In our second installment of our map series we have taken two of our talented artists, notorious for detail, Jonny Duddle and Tomislav Tomic who both have very different styles. However they have a common thread when it comes to illustrating maps for the inside of books. Both create fantastical and mysterious worlds, Jonny’s maps consist of pirates and swashbuckling adventures, Tomislav’s an ancient mysterious world of magical creatures and people.

 

Maps generally have certain aspects which have not changed for many years, making them instantly recognisable.  “During the last seven centuries the map reader has had to adapt himself to change far less than the book reader.” R.A.Skelton, Historian. The Art of Illustrated Maps.

 

Maps started out primitively representing the world as an idea, and over time the world started to be represented as an object. Today we have a mixture of the two, we have abstract, and we have representational. We invite you to lose yourself in the exquisite work by both of these talented illustrators.

Jonny Duddle North Map

Jonny Duddle North Map, Nation by Terry Pratchett, Doubleday.

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Jonny Duddle South Map

Jonny Duddle South Map, Nation by Terry Pratchett, Doubleday.

 

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Jonny Duddle Europe Map

Jonny Duddle, The Emerald Casket, Harper Collins.

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Jonny Duddle- Pirate Cruncher

Jonny Duddle, The Pirate Cruncher, Templar.

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Tomislav Tomic Fantasy Map

Tomislav Tomic, Fantasy Map.

 

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Tomislav Tomic Oceanology Map

Tomislav Tomic Oceanology Map, Templar.

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Tomislav Tomic Harry Potter Map

Tomislav Tomic Harry Potter Map, Bloomsbury.

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Tomislav Tomic Map

Tomislav Tomic, Dubrovnik.

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Take a look at our first post about maps here and the work of David Hitch.